Posts Tagged ‘ bus ticket ’

Already 10.000 SMS tickets sold at De Lijn

A week after the launch of the new SMS ticketing service, Flemish transport company De Lijn has already sold 10.000 tickets by SMS.  That’s an average of 1.300 SMS tickets per day.

Buying a SMS ticket can be done by sending the code DL (ticket for 60 minutes) or the code DL120 (ticket for 120 minutes) to the shortcode number 4884.  The confirmation message that is received, can be used as a valid ticket on the bus.  The ticket costs 1,30 euro for 1 hour or 2,10 euro for 2 hours, which is about 28% cheaper than the tickets bought from the bus driver.

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SMS ticket for the bus available in February

As of the 1st of February 2010, passengers travelling by bus in Flanders will be able to buy their ticket by SMS.  Public transport company De Lijn has worked out a SMS payment system, but unfortunately only with Proximus.  Negociations with Mobistar and Base are being held but not yet finished.

To buy the ticket, you just send a SMS to the shortcode 4884.   If your bus ride lasts 60 minutes or less, you send the code DL at a tariff of 1,30 Euro; for 120 minutes you send DL120 and you pay 2,10 Euro.  The confirmation SMS that is received, counts as your bus ticket.  De Lijn claims the SMS ticket is about 28% cheaper than the ticket bought from the bus driver.

Belgacom introduces mobile payment service Ping.Ping

Last week, Belgacom announced they’re taking a 40% share in Tunz, a Belgian company specialized in micropayments.

This week, the telecom giant said they are starting up a mobile payment service called Ping.Ping, which should allow to pay with your mobile phone for small amounts, such as a can in a vending machine or a drink in a bar.
Belgacom has made a large range of partnerships for this service.  One of them is with Accor Services, responsible for the food checks.  Goal is to digitize the food checks and put the value on a digital account. In a first trial, 500 Belgacom employees will be able to spend this digital money in horeca establishments in the neighborhood of Belgacom’s headquarters in Brussels.

There’s also a partnership with Coca-Cola, testing out the micropayment for vending machines.  Another trial will be with supermarket Delhaize.
To allow a ‘contact-less’ payment, the NFC technology will be used.  If the trials are successful, Delhaize wants to introduce customer identification by the mobile phone instead of the Delhaize Plus card. 

Ping.Ping is supposed to become a group name for all these different mobile payment services.  The already existing SMS parking and SMS bus ticketing – services from Mobile-for which was acquired by Belgacom – would also fall under this umbrella.  Belgacom promises several more applications in the coming weeks and months, including vouchers, reduction coupons, payments on campus and person-to-person payments. 

pingping-mobile-payment

A bright future for mobile payments

According to Juniper Research, about 2,1 billion mobile consumers worldwide will be using their mobile phone to pay for digital goods by 2013.  They point out that ever more digital goods are viewed as necessary by the age group under 35.  People who are 15 or 20 years old today will use their mobile to directly pay for mobile services such as mobile music downloads.  Smartphone devices such as the iPhone encourage this evolution even more. 

While mobile payments can be used for music, games, tickets, infotainment and other digital goods, we don’t see that many concrete examples yet today.  Probably the best prove that it works are the sms parking service and the sms bus tickets that exists is several Belgian cities now.  Last week, De lijn announced that it sold its 200.000th SMS ticket.  Since it’s launch in September 2007, there are about 17.000 travellers a month that their their bus fare by SMS.  62% of those are on the account of Antwerp, the other 38% for Ghent.  Later this year, De Lijn will decide if the project will be extended to other cities.  The advantage for the consumer is that the SMS ticket is cheaper than a normal ticket (1,20 euro instead of 1,60).  Unfortunately, it is only available for Proximus subscribers.