Posts Tagged ‘ mobile web ’

Can a paid iPhone App contain advertising?

As a result of the recent launch of De Standaard iPhone App, a heavy debate is going on about the fact that this premium News App contains advertising. It raises many interesting issues:

  • to which extent can a paid App contain advertising? Or should advertising only be included in free Apps?
  • what is the correct price of a “no-advertising-please” App? Apparently some users state that they would be willing to pay even more NOT to see any advertising.
  • what type of “sponsoring” is more acceptable/less acceptable: eg mobile coupons with clear advantages versus mobile banners

Please post your points of view on the LinkedIn Web Goes Mobile discussion forum or via Twitter #wgm4.

Mobile case studies from Netlog, Touring Mobilis, Nu.nl, Tènce

Discover field experience from Netlog, Touring Mobilis, Nu.nl, Tènce

Which leading companies have developped a mobile site, and which have opted for a mobile app?
On the 19th of November 2009, the 4th Web Goes Mobile seminar will present 4 Belgian and Dutch case studies:

» Netlog Mobile – Louis Jonckheere (Netlog)

» Nu.nl – Roel Engel (Ilse Media)

» Tènce Mobiel – Marc Schoutens (Mobillion)

» Touring Mobilis – Jan Cools (Be-Mobile)

Subscribe now for this free seminar – places are limited.

b_wgm2009_300x250

1 out of 5 Americans surf daily on mobile

Almost 1 out of every 5 Americans surfs the mobile internet on a daily basis.

According to a new study by the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, the daily visitors rate of the mobile web currently counts 19% of the population, compared to only 11% in December 2007.

32% of Americans use a mobile device to check e-mails, IM or information search, compared to 24% in late 2007.

African Americans are the most active and fastest-growing segment of mobile web users.

Yahoo launches personalized mobile web portal

Later this month, web giant Yahoo! will launch its new Yahoo Mobile service, allowing a personalized mobile starting point to the web. 

Key components include Yahoo oneSearch, Yahoo oneConnect (providing access to email, messaging, contacts and social networking sites), Yahoo News and Yahoo onePlace, which enables users to access and manage preferred content from a single location.   A smartphone-optimized version will include several additional services.

Read the full press release here

yahoo

8 mobile technologies to follow

Research firm Gartner sees an important role for the following 8 mobile technologies in the further development of the mobile market.

1. Bluetooth 3.0
Bluetooth 3.0 will be introduced this year but won’t be integrated into devices until 2010.  Advantages include the  ‘ultra-low-power mode’,  allowing sensors to use this technology.

2. Mobile user interface
Gartner expects manufacturers to differentiate from each other by building in user friendly interfaces.  But different interfaces won’t facilitate the development of mobile applications.

3. Location sensitive
Mobile applications can become more useful when they can ‘sense’ the location of the user.

4. 802.11n
This new wifi protocol will play an important role, delivering faster data transfer and better coverage.  New access points, new interfaces and new backbones will be necessary but the dream of the ‘all wireless office’ comes closer.

5. Display technology
New types of displays will arrive, both passive (e-Books) and active.

6. Mobile web & widgets
The mobile web and its widgets are a cheap way to allow certain applications on mobiledevices.

7. Mobile broadband networks
Mobile broadband will gain (even more) importance. HSPA can be an important add-on or even replacement of wifi hotspots.

8. Near field communication (NFC)
NFC allows mobile devices to communicate with other devices over a distance of a few centimeters.  This can allow services such as mobile payment, mobile vouchers and the exchange of pictures.

Mobile web use increases with 94%

According to a report from browser supplier Opera, the use of the mobile web has increased with 94% in the past year.  In November 2008, users of the mobile browser Opera Mini surfed through 5,7 billion mobile pages.  That’s an increase of more than 300% compared to a year earlier.  Most popular mobile sites were Google, Facebook and Bebo.

According to Jon von Tetzchner, CEO of Opera, the success is due to the fact that people now can and want to surf mobile.

More facts & figures from the State of the Mobile Web here.

Web Goes Mobile 3: food for thought

On December 4th, the third edition of the Web Goes Mobile seminar took place. Many enthusiastic participants received new insights from a unique panel of eminent speakers. The absentees were wrong this year as well, but can still get a short summary here.

“Almost 1 million Belgians surf mobile regularly”

photo-palte Nanno Palte of Insites Consulting started off the seminar as the first keynote speaker, presenting the results of the Mobile Mapping study. This showed that 47% of the Belgian population owns a device that allows the use of the mobile internet. 19% of those visit the mobile web regularly. Most of them are young men from all income classes.

“Mobile is essential in our 0-1-7 vision”
photo-vandermeerschNext up was Peter Vandermeersch, General Editor in Chief of Corelio, who explained the mobile strategy of the group. Mobile plays an essential role in the “0-1-7” vision that was developed by the group to bring news reporting. Ever more, the news must be brought ‘hot of the press’ (on the moment “0”) to the web and the mobile (for example through SMS alerts or on the mobile site). Peter Vandermeersch made a very explicit call to all actors, not the least to the mobile operators to help encourage the market.

“The mobile phone becomes the remote control of our life”
photo-goldingPaul Golding, a British expert in Mobile 2.0 and author on the subject, brought a strong case for the development of new mobile 2.0 applications. All technological barriers that existed before, have been cleared throughout the past few years. The new “internet-centric” devices, such as the iPhone bring a new and formerly unknown user experience. That user experience encourages the development of new applications. In the creation of the mobile eco-system, Golding believes that mobile social networks will become one of the killer apps.

“We bet on the web”
photo-vanlerbergheMarc Vanlerberghe is a Belgian who plays a very important role in the development of mobile applications at Google as their Global Product Marketing Director Mobile. Google invests heavily in the mobile medium, knowing that worldwide there are already twice as many mobile users than internet/pc users.

Google notices the very strong impact of the internet capable devices such as the iPhone: the amount of search queries that enter through an iPhone is many times higher than those through other smartphones (such as Nokia or BlackBerry). The key explanation lies in the user experience and the simplicity of the browser.

Google chooses explicitly for the development of mobile web applications and not for downloadable applications. Because of the proliferation of devices and operating systems, the cost for the development, maintenance and distribution of local “on-device” applications is much too high. Furthermore, a mobile web application offers a lot more possibilities for fast innovations, because you can introduce new features in a “24 hour turnaround model”. Lastly, Google strongly stresses the open innovation model, which puts the introduction of the Android platform central.

Do you want more food for thought from the seminar? Watch the videos and the presentations on www.webgoesmobile.be

The mobile internet train has left the station

Finally we’re there: after many years of patient evangelization we see this year the launch of the first commercial mobile internet sites. De Standaard was the first to launch his mobile news site. This was followed by several other mobile initiatives, such as De Tijd, VDAB, Jobat, Telenet, Truvo and the VRT.

The development of the mobile internet in Belgium seems to have lifted off. And this is only the beginning: when we look at our neighbouring countries, we can expect a strong growth in the offering ànd the use of the mobile internet in the coming months. In France, 25% of the 15-50 year olds uses the mobile internet on a weekly basis. In the Netherlands, 1,6 million mobile subscribers frequently use the mobile internet. In the past few years, the growth of the mobile data traffic has shown a growth rhythm of 50 – 100%.

Many companies and marketers are, with good reason, asking themselves whether they should jump the band wagon or not. Proponents see enormous business opportunities for specific mobile internet applications:

  • The possibility to stay in touch with the client or the end-user “anytime, anywhere”;
  • The capturing and monetizing of “impulse-moments”, when the mobile phone is the only device at hand of the consumer;
  • The building of a mobile user group, complementary and even larger than the users of existing media.

Critics however see mainly barriers for the implementation of a mobile internet site:

  • Many companies are only just now occupied with the building up of their corporate website and internet activities. An additional mobile platform only causes an additional complexity.
  • Some claim that the availability of a separate mobile site is not really necessary since the iPhone and its adapted Safari browser.
  • In the present difficult economical circumstances, there is not much budget available for the implementation of such new initiatives.

For many different initiatives, we – as a privileged partner – have been able to build up certain insights, which can serve to bring some perspective to the decision process:

  • Mobile internet is mostly important for young people (hence the success of the mobile version of Facebook) and professionals who want to be continuously fed with “real-time” information, as proven by the rapid success of De Standaard Mobile;
  • The consumption of the mobile internet site is often very different and complementary to this of a website (as well in intensity, time and frequency of the use);
  • The simplicity of the pages and the speed at which they charge are primary design elements at the development of a mobile internet site; most existing websites are totally not adapted for consumption on a mobile device (not even on an iPhone).

The question is no longer whether companies will launch mobile internet sites, but rather when they preferably should do this. Building up the first insights in time seems primordial to us to have a good position in this fast developing market. The companies that now have, within a limited budget, the guts to launch their first projects will without a doubt be able to get the benefits from this on the short term. That’s what they call: “first movers’ advantage”.

BlackBerry Web Signals notify about new mobile content

Research In Motion (RIM) announced the availability of the new BlackBerry Web Signals technology for the BlackBerry developer community.

BlackBerry Web Signals leverages RIM’s unique push technology to allow online content providers to automatically notify BlackBerry smartphone users when relevant content has been published and to allow streamlined, one-click access to the online information. With online content services powered by BlackBerry Web Signals, BlackBerry smartphone users can spend less time searching the web and more time connecting directly to the content that matters to them personally. Content providers will offer a range of services powered by BlackBerry Web Signals that enable customers to stay connected with news, weather, sports, entertainment, financial information and more.

Read more

Mobile surfing in US as popular as in UK

Surfing on the mobile internet is becoming more and more popular in the United States. According to Bango, the use will soon surpass the level of the United Kingdom, where mobile surfing has been common for years.

Bango reports the top 5 countries for July 2008:
– UK (19,35 %)
– US (18,88 %)
– India (10,82 %)
– South Africa (8,82 %)
– Indonesia (4,08 %)

Apart from the UK, Spain is the only other European country that made it into the Top 10.

Interesting detail: that top 10 represents worldwide almost 75% of all mobile web use; the rest is divided over 91 other countries.

(Source: Digimedia)