Posts Tagged ‘ sms pay ’

MobileWeb supports 11.11.11 through SMS campaign

MobileWeb and the mobile partners KPN Group Belgium, Mobistar, Proximus and Telenet join forces and open a short SMS number to collect money for 11.11.11. Clients can send a message to 4666 and donate €1 for the campaign. This year’s action wants to draw attention on climate change and the impact of it on the South. Global warming is threatening the life of people in 3rd World Countries and creates famine and drought for billions of people.

SMS has proven to be a very effective fundraising method. Previous campaigns for the earthquake in Haïti, the flood in Pakistan and the famine in Africa all generated high contributions. MobileWeb supports again free of charge the technical part and is the preferred partner for these kind of actions. We have the knowledge and technical capacity to setup fast and easy SMS-campaigns for organisations. The 11.11.11 campaign was ready and operational in less than 48 hours.

Support 11.11.11 and send a message to 4666!
(from 6 tot 21 November 2011)

Already 10.000 SMS tickets sold at De Lijn

A week after the launch of the new SMS ticketing service, Flemish transport company De Lijn has already sold 10.000 tickets by SMS.  That’s an average of 1.300 SMS tickets per day.

Buying a SMS ticket can be done by sending the code DL (ticket for 60 minutes) or the code DL120 (ticket for 120 minutes) to the shortcode number 4884.  The confirmation message that is received, can be used as a valid ticket on the bus.  The ticket costs 1,30 euro for 1 hour or 2,10 euro for 2 hours, which is about 28% cheaper than the tickets bought from the bus driver.

SMS ticket for the bus available in February

As of the 1st of February 2010, passengers travelling by bus in Flanders will be able to buy their ticket by SMS.  Public transport company De Lijn has worked out a SMS payment system, but unfortunately only with Proximus.  Negociations with Mobistar and Base are being held but not yet finished.

To buy the ticket, you just send a SMS to the shortcode 4884.   If your bus ride lasts 60 minutes or less, you send the code DL at a tariff of 1,30 Euro; for 120 minutes you send DL120 and you pay 2,10 Euro.  The confirmation SMS that is received, counts as your bus ticket.  De Lijn claims the SMS ticket is about 28% cheaper than the ticket bought from the bus driver.

Belgian elections: still no mobile marketing, no social media

I blogged several times on the successful use of mobile marketing in Obama’s election campaign.  In fact, it’s been praised as a great example of the possibilities of mobile marketing on many international sites and blogs.

One would think many would follow his example, right?  After all, Obama proved the many advantages of using SMS and Mobile Internet in a campaign: it’s fast, you reach a lot of people, you prove to be into modern technology, and it’s a great way to build in interactivity and people involvement.

So instead of sticking to those lame (and expensive!) billboards in people’s gardens, Belgian politicians and parties have had developped their own mobile site with their political program and the latest news.  They have offered SMS alerts to remind voters what they stand for.  They have held collects by SMS payment to fund their campaign among party members.

At least, that’s just some of the things they COULD have done.  But we have seen none of that appear.  The cliché of the Belgian who sticks to the old, to what he knows, has once again been confirmed by our very own political figures.  Instead of showing their progressive side, stimulating innovation in Belgian business, they’ve chosen to play it safe.

No social media were used either.  Several international examples have recently adopted social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and YouTube with big success.  Apart from some local initiatives and Facebook fan groups, we’ve seen nothing of that either in the Belgian election campaigns.

Better luck next time?

PS: I forgot to mention one of the exceptions: CAP (Comité pour une Autre Politique) uses a SMS Payment service to fund their election campaign. Big thumbs up to them!

SMS Parking: Schaarbeek in, Gent out

Paying your parking ticket by SMS; it’s one of the most successful examples of SMS payment in Belgium.
Especially in Antwerp, where it was first introduced, it’s been a success.

Ghent followed soon after, but the service there has now stopped, after experiencing technical problems since February.   NCS Crandy, the company behind the service in Ghent, has given up and has removed all stickers from parking automats.  Apparently, the service hasn’t been available since March 17 already.  The complicated system caused the service to be a lot less successful than in other cities.

But good news: Schaarbeek is now the first community in the Brussels area to start offering the SMS parking service.   Proximus clients will be charged for their parking ticket directly on their mobile invoice or deducted from their call credit.  Mobistar and Base subscribers will receive a separate invoice.

Among other cities that offer parking by SMS are Hasselt, Bruges and Tienen.
Many other cities are introducing the service in the coming months, such as Leuven (May) and Heusden-Zolder (July).

parking

Next year mobile payment for train tickets?

The Belgian railways (NMBS/SNCB) has been talking about SMS ticketing for a while already. 
Recently, Minister of Public Companies Steven Vanackere stated that there’s currently no project regarding mobile payments.  But now Philippe Tomberg , publicist for NMBS, carefully said that the company is studying different channels to digitize the train ticket.  The possibility to offer mobile ticketing on a mid-long term (say, a year from now) “can not excluded”. 

Still pretty vague, but a step in the right direction…

A bright future for mobile payments

According to Juniper Research, about 2,1 billion mobile consumers worldwide will be using their mobile phone to pay for digital goods by 2013.  They point out that ever more digital goods are viewed as necessary by the age group under 35.  People who are 15 or 20 years old today will use their mobile to directly pay for mobile services such as mobile music downloads.  Smartphone devices such as the iPhone encourage this evolution even more. 

While mobile payments can be used for music, games, tickets, infotainment and other digital goods, we don’t see that many concrete examples yet today.  Probably the best prove that it works are the sms parking service and the sms bus tickets that exists is several Belgian cities now.  Last week, De lijn announced that it sold its 200.000th SMS ticket.  Since it’s launch in September 2007, there are about 17.000 travellers a month that their their bus fare by SMS.  62% of those are on the account of Antwerp, the other 38% for Ghent.  Later this year, De Lijn will decide if the project will be extended to other cities.  The advantage for the consumer is that the SMS ticket is cheaper than a normal ticket (1,20 euro instead of 1,60).  Unfortunately, it is only available for Proximus subscribers.